Paraguay semi-naked couple seen having sex on bike

Image result for couple biking

India, Feb 22, 2017 – Asianage

The video was shot on the Santa Maria road in south-eastern Paraguay

Couples display their affection openly in many places but they definitely do not have sex on the street. In a bizarre incident, a Paraguay couple did have sex, not just in public but on a street on the bike.

According to a report in the Mirror, the unidentified couple was seen in the Santa Maria neighbourhood in south-eastern Paraguay. The couple were having sex while the boy was riding the bike and the girl had her legs wrapped around his waist while facing him. A passer-by filmed the scene and was shocked at seeing what they saw.

Many people highlighted the fact that while they were busy having sex, they did not have any protective gear like helmets and they were in danger. The video was posted on many community forums and now the police are looking for the couple.

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Kenya: Nakuru’s Sex Workers Form Group to Address Their Grievances

Kenya, FEBRUARY 26, 2016 – All Africa

Nakuru Town has more than 4,000 commercial sex workers who operate day and night mostly along Kanu Street, Baringo Road and Gusii Road.

They boast of a variety of clients who include MPs, MCAs, bankers, journalists and even pastors!

In the recent past, the sex workers, through an advocacy group called Smart Ladies, have been lobbying for a review of sections of the law that criminalise prostitution.

The group brings together all those giving their services in the town. Ms Daisy Achieng, their spokesman, says they formed the group with an intention of having it help them address their challenges, including legal issues.

“Smart Ladies is the umbrella organisation which looks into the welfare of commercial sex workers, including training, advocacy and handling emerging legal issues. It basically deals with the all-round welfare of the commercial sex workers,” she explained.

BRUTAL MURDERS

The group was mooted after a number of them were brutally murdered under unclear circumstances while on “duty”. Many others have been assaulted by their clients.

At least ten sex workers in the town have been killed in a span of about five months.

The sex workers say it has been difficult to get their grievances addressed due to the perception by society and authorities on what they do for a living, leaving victims of various forms of abuses suffering.
“I have been doing the job for 14 years and we used to face a number of challenges including killings. We used to get confused when we found one of us killed and dumped somewhere as we didn’t know who to face,” she said.

Through the group, they now have secured lawyers who handle their cases whenever they have legal matters to deal with.

They are also working with hotel owners to ensure that they are safe as they carry on with their business.

“If one of us is killed in your hotel room, we file a case with the hotel owner. We are their customers and they are too,” she said.

Ms Faith Omaria, a member of the advocacy group says although the group was formed much earlier, it has not able to help the members as they had little knowledge on its importance, until recently.

It was only after attending a number of workshops that members have been empowered through organised training.

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China’s Sex Industry ‘Too Big to Fail’

China, February 19, 2014 – The Epoch Times

China has launched a high-profile campaign against prostitution recently, with loud editorials in the state-run press and round-ups of hundreds of prostitutes who are humiliated in front of the cameras. No media organization in China is allowed to question the campaign, according to recent propaganda directives leaked online.

The purpose of the thunderous crackdown is to show that Communist Party leaders are serious about attacking corruption—and prostitution is a great hotbed of corruption.

Simultaneously, however, analysts are questioning whether the crackdown is really being conducted in earnest. Over the last few decades, prostitution has grown so much that it seems simply impractical to stamp out entirely. It’s a backbone industry of the country now.

Target Dongguan
The manufacturing city of Dongguan, in the south of China, was the first target of the arrests and propaganda. Official media congratulated the hardworking police who arrested nearly 1,000 prostitutes and clients in nearly 200 locations.

This is only a fraction of the sex industry in Dongguan, however: the sex industry there is had an annual turnover of 50 billion yuan ($8.2 billion) last year, about a seventh of the city’s GDP, said a source familiar with the industry in an interview with Oriental Morning Post, a newspaper in Shanghai.

Dongguan’s economic growth has been above the national average since the 1990s, when the sex industry there took off, the report said. Dongguan is also a manufacturing and assembly center, however.

The source told the Oriental Morning Post that there are 250,000 prostitutes in Dongguan, embedded in places of business like saunas, leisure clubs, hair salons, massage parlors, and nice hotels. Hundreds of thousands more are in associated industries, like jewelry, cosmetics, and transportation.

National Prostitution
Dongguan is perhaps an extreme example of what goes on across China.

Although the sex industry is not considered in the National Bureau of Statistics reports, some researchers in and outside China have looked at the issue.

Wu Hai, a hotel CEO in China, published an “Analysis of the China Sex Industry and Its Impact on Hotel Management” in 2012, which revealed some startling numbers.

The report indicates that the total value of prostitution each year is nearly 500 billion yuan ($82 billion) per year, and that there are around five million sex workers. The price of sex transactions vary depend on the place, but the nationwide average is about 200 yuan ($33) per incident, the report says.

The World Health Organization says that China had an estimated four to six million sex workers in 2008. The industry has expanded rapidly since 1990s.

‘Too Big To Fail’
He Qinglian, a Chinese economist now living in the United States, said that the sex industry makes a huge contribution to the Chinese economy.

In fact, it’s “too big to fail,” she wrote in a recent analysis for Voice of America’s Mandarin service.

“If China’s economy cannot create new jobs for these grassroots people, an industry that’s connected to 5-7 million people’s careers, and 20-30 million people’s livelihoods (including family members that sex workers need to support) will tenaciously come back, even though some of the authorities want to crackdown on it.”

Activists in China have called for decriminalizing the sex industry, in light of the recent crackdown and the entrenched nature of prostitution.

He Qinglian said that decriminalizing it would lessen the threat of triads to sex workers, encourage them to undergo regular health exams, and possibly decrease the instances of group sex, often reported to be ordered up by corrupt Chinese officials.

‘Gray Zone’
Rapid industrialization and modernization in China after the Cultural Revolution was the seed for the growth of the sex industry, according to Pan Suiming, president and professor at Institute of Sexuality Gender of Renmin University of China.

The reforms in the late 1970s led large numbers of Chinese to join the sex trade, after they had lost their land in the countryside. The influx of prostitutes served a rapidly growing rich population, Pan write in his “History and the Sex Industry.”

Official corruption has been another major stimulus to the growth of prostitution in China. Communist Party officials pay for their trysts with public funds, and sexual bribery is a constant in official transactions in China.

Chinese law says that prostitution is illegal, but it is so rampant as to render the law mostly meaningless—except when the authorities wish to carry out a political campaign.

“The sex industry in China has become a gray zone between the law and reality,” said Zhang Tianliang, an independent analyst of Chinese politics, in an interview.

“On the one hand the Communist Party wants to whitewash itself by not legalizing the sex industry. On the other hand, all levels of Party officials indulge themselves at those places, making it difficult to ban.”

Protection from officials and police is another reason why crackdowns are always short lived.

“The crackdown on prostitution always punishes the prostitutes, who have no political connections or power,” Zhang said. “A lot of the fines from those crackdowns go into peoples’ pockets. And the sex trade in some places is controlled by people with political ties.”

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Decision on same-sex marriage bill on hold amid dispute

China, November 30, 2016 – The China Post

TAIPEI, Taiwan — A bill that would make Taiwan the first Asian country to legalize same-sex marriage is rolling through the legislative system, but the push to approve necessary proposals has become mired in dispute and amendments will likely have to wait until next April at the earliest to be finalized.

The ruling Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) legislative caucus whip Ker Chien-ming (柯建銘) said Tuesday that all proposed bills for amending the Civil Code are scheduled for review on Dec. 26.

DPP Legislator Yu Mei-nu (尤美女) said lawmakers had reached a consensus for proposed versions of the bill to be reviewed and passed on to the next legislative process — the committee stage — within the same week.

But even if the bill goes on to the committee stage for its first reading straight after the review, the controversial bill will likely remain stuck in limbo and fail to make it through a third reading by the end of the current legislative session.

“Marriage equality is a contentious issue that has divided society. I hope people with opposing views may take this time to reflect. Only this way can people begin to truly communicate again,” Yu said.

The debate surrounding same-sex marriage has recently boiled down to the question of how to make it happen.

Amendments currently under consideration include one proposed by Yu, one by the New Power Party (NPP) and another by opposition Kuomintang (KMT) Legislator Hsu Yu-jen (許毓仁) — all versions seek to legalize same-sex marriage and allow gay married couples to adopt children.

Yu said lawmakers still have the chance offer up new versions of the bill before the scheduled review date — pointing to calls for formulating a special act to legalize same-sex marriage rather than revising the Civil Code.

The idea of introducing the special statute has drawn outrage from local LGBT activist groups, such as the Taiwan Alliance to Promote Civil Partnership, which said enacting a new law runs counter to the spirit of marriage equality, calling separation itself a legal endorsement of discrimination.

“We want equal rights, not a special law,” read placards held by demonstrators as they took to the streets near the Legislative Yuan on Monday. Around 10,000 protesters gathered along Qingdao East Road that day as a public hearing on the bill was underway.

According to the Central News Agency (CNA), top DPP lawmaker Ker Chien-ming argued against labelling special acts as discriminatory.

“The Physicians Act (醫師法) is also a set of laws separated from the Civil Code. Does that mean it is discriminates against doctors? Legislation should be more detailed and make laws that are feasible, practical. An undoable law will only cause more controversy,” Ker said.

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WB police alerted on sex racket accused

India, Feb 20, 2016 – The Assam Tribune

SHILLONG, Feb 20 – Meghalaya police has sent a lookout notice to its West Bengal counterpart for a person involved in the sex racket of a 14-year-old minor, in which 17 people have been arrested so far.
The police sent the photo of one Sudhir Kumar Paul, a resident of North 24 Parganas, West Bengal, requesting its counterpart there to look out for the accused and if traced, to arrest him.

Sudhir is believed to have fled the State, but is being hunted in the case involving the minor girl’s rape and illegal trafficking. The police are investigating the case under the Protection of Children against Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act.

All the accused have been booked under POCSO that includes Mawhati legislator, Julius Dorphang currently lodged at Nongpoh jail in Ri-Bhoi district.

The police recently arrested the Manager of Marvelene Inn, Edmund Kharir. The Inn is owned by the family of Home Minister, HDR Lyngdoh and pressure is on for the Minister’s removal from his post.

Meanwhile, the victim has been able to identify another accused who exploited her. The accused is a professor and the victim could only recall his last name “Prof Roy.”

There are other persons accused in the case that the police are looking out for. Some of the accused who have not been identified properly are a businessman, an army officer and an elderly man.

The police say they have a fair hint about these persons, but they are treading cautiously so that they have a watertight case. The police have already submitted a charge sheet against Dorphang.

Additional charge sheet would be submitted soon after more evidence is gathered. Ri-Bhoi district police is going to file a charge sheet against the MLA anytime now. The victim was allegedly raped in the district too, apart from here. So a separate case is lodged against the MLA there.